The Archipelago

São Miguel Santa Maria Terceira Faial Pico São Jorge Graciosa Flores Corvo Grupo Ocidental Grupo Central Grupo Oriental
São Miguel
Santa Maria
Terceira
Faial
Pico
São Jorge
Graciosa
Flores
Corvo
Western Group
Central Group
Eastern Group

Geography

All the nine islands of the Azores Archipelago are  volcanic origin and are located roughly between 37° and 40° north latitude and 25° and 31° west longitude, with the island of Flores marking the westernmost border of the European continent. 244,780 people (2008 data) live in the 2,325 sq. of this island territory, which is part of the Portuguese state and constitutes the Autonomous Region of the Azores.

The islands of the archipelago are divided in three geographical groups: the Eastern Group, comprising Santa Maria and São Miguel, the Central Group, including Terceira, Graciosa, São Jorge, Pico and Faial, and the Western Group, composed by Corvo and Flores. The Azores, along with the archipelagos of Madeira, Canary Islands and Cape Verde, constitute the biogeographic region of Macaronesia, a name which means "fortunate islands" for those who live there and visit them.

Positioning systems find the nine islands of the Azores in the North Atlantic, scattered along a 600 km stretch of ocean from Santa Maria to Corvo, approximately between 37° and 40° north latitude and 25° and 31° west longitude. According to 2011 data, 246,772 people live in this island territory that covers 2,325 sq.km, distancing 1,815 km from mainland Europe (Portugal) and 2,625 km from the North American continent (Canada).